Gallery III


Paper Comp. XIV.jpg

ERIC HAZELTINE

'Going Solo' Award-winner from Putting It Together

Synchronicity: Borrow Moments

May 11 - June 22, 2018

I’m interested in the degradation and weakening of the physical body through our daily struggles as we simultaneously try to salvage and prolong our lives. The use and abuse we go through is a major contributor to how long we will last, and this holds true within my work as well. Despite the lengthy process of initial creation of my handmade paper in preparation for the strain they will go through, it does not guarantee them strength or easy recovery throughout the course of their lives. This inevitable decay and weathering of material in my work mirrors that of our bodies and the constant potential for failure.

My explorations in this idea delve into how the materials I use in my handmade paper handle the processes of deterioration and wear. Depending on the physical properties of the material, some may simply show scars or imprints of their past, whereas others may be weakened to the point of fragility, barely able to hold together against the weight of themselves. When first created, the material is new and unharmed but as the lengthy process of my work continues, it shows scars, rips, and moments of destruction. In hopes to prolong the length of their usefulness, and ultimately, their lifespan, I also repair and restore them through the process, only for them to withstand more degradation. Through the decay and the intentional manipulation of my work, every mark becomes a road map to each piece’s past. They begin to show evidence of a life lived, and the wear they obtain shows more presence and proof of existence than a perfected piece of paper.

Throughout this process, there is a constant push and pull between destruction and conservation. In some ways the creation of my pieces is a form of making and unmaking at the same time. I’m reducing, while constructing; diminishing, while preserving; and weakening, then restoring. These contrasting processes have resonance with me and convey the beauty I find in the worn out nature of materials in process, as well as content. While certain materials may withstand the treatment better than others, they all wind up beautifully marked, corroded, and blemished in their own way.